A New York Times exposé on the realities of homeless children in NYC featured a story of an 11-year-old girl living in the Auburn Family Residence homeless shelter. They describe the city-run shelter:

It is a place where mold creeps up walls and roaches swarm, where feces and vomit plug communal toilets, where sexual predators have roamed and small children stand guard for their single mothers outside filthy showers.

How did the NY Post heartlessly respond? By claiming that the family featured in the story "aren’t really homeless at all," because they live in a 540 square ft. shelter, and that NYC has been “too generous” for providing a place to live, even if the shelter has “mice and reports of sexual assaults and other crimes.”
The New York Post’s mentality is a perfect example of how the mainstream media contributes to the cycle of poverty, hunger and homelessness in our country. In fact there is a record high of over 1.1 million homeless school-aged children in the U.S., according to data released by the U.S. Department of Education. But if media continue to downplay this reality, it will take even longer for our country to rise above the massive income inequality that plagues the nation. How can we expect over a million children to be able to obtain a decent education —leading to decent jobs— when they are living in conditions like this?
Photo Credit: New York Times

New York Times exposé on the realities of homeless children in NYC featured a story of an 11-year-old girl living in the Auburn Family Residence homeless shelter. They describe the city-run shelter:

It is a place where mold creeps up walls and roaches swarm, where feces and vomit plug communal toilets, where sexual predators have roamed and small children stand guard for their single mothers outside filthy showers.

How did the NY Post heartlessly respond? By claiming that the family featured in the story "aren’t really homeless at all," because they live in a 540 square ft. shelter, and that NYC has been “too generous” for providing a place to live, even if the shelter has “mice and reports of sexual assaults and other crimes.”

The New York Post’s mentality is a perfect example of how the mainstream media contributes to the cycle of poverty, hunger and homelessness in our country. In fact there is a record high of over 1.1 million homeless school-aged children in the U.S., according to data released by the U.S. Department of Education. But if media continue to downplay this reality, it will take even longer for our country to rise above the massive income inequality that plagues the nation. How can we expect over a million children to be able to obtain a decent education —leading to decent jobs— when they are living in conditions like this?

Photo Credit: New York Times