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"Let men be men": Fox hosts eagerly agreed with the NY Post article that claimed “catcalls are flattering.” 
A few more gems from this segment: 
"They mean it in a nice way."
"It’s nice to get compliments."
"As long as you don’t come within arms length, it’s fine."
But for many women, catcalls are humiliating and degrading. Some blame themselves, wondering what they could have done differently to prevent it. And the consequences can considerably affect a person’s social behavior and habits, as women report “they avoid eye contact and walking alone in public, or change their outfits or routes to avoid harassment.”  
In reality, this is no small problem. According to Stop Street Harassment, “at least 65% of women have experienced catcalls, leers, and unwanted sexual propositions,” disproportionately affecting those with low incomes, women of color, and the LGBTQ community. And while there are federal laws protecting women from workplace harassment, street harassment is addressed on a state-by-state basis.
Let’s bring some voices of reason into this discussion:
Natalie DiBlasio, USA TODAY:

Catcalling does not mean you are beautiful, smart, strong or interesting. Catcalling means a stranger values you so little he doesn’t care if he makes you feel uncomfortable or threatened.

Margaret Eby, Brooklyn Magazine:

Catcalling is about control, not about your cute shorts. It’s an assertion that women are just visitors in a male space, there to be assessed by appearance and summarily dismissed or flirted with.

Ashley Ross, TIME:

To legitimize catcalling is to give voice to those who don’t deserve it: the man who told me he wanted to perform oral sex on me, the man who said he wanted it the other way around and the man who said he could have me if he wanted me. 

The dehumanizing culture of catcalling must stop, but conservative media outlets like Fox aren’t helping. It’s up to us all to educate ourselves about the harms of harassment, so that women can truly be free in the streets of America. "Let men be men": Fox hosts eagerly agreed with the NY Post article that claimed “catcalls are flattering.” 
A few more gems from this segment: 
"They mean it in a nice way."
"It’s nice to get compliments."
"As long as you don’t come within arms length, it’s fine."
But for many women, catcalls are humiliating and degrading. Some blame themselves, wondering what they could have done differently to prevent it. And the consequences can considerably affect a person’s social behavior and habits, as women report “they avoid eye contact and walking alone in public, or change their outfits or routes to avoid harassment.”  
In reality, this is no small problem. According to Stop Street Harassment, “at least 65% of women have experienced catcalls, leers, and unwanted sexual propositions,” disproportionately affecting those with low incomes, women of color, and the LGBTQ community. And while there are federal laws protecting women from workplace harassment, street harassment is addressed on a state-by-state basis.
Let’s bring some voices of reason into this discussion:
Natalie DiBlasio, USA TODAY:

Catcalling does not mean you are beautiful, smart, strong or interesting. Catcalling means a stranger values you so little he doesn’t care if he makes you feel uncomfortable or threatened.

Margaret Eby, Brooklyn Magazine:

Catcalling is about control, not about your cute shorts. It’s an assertion that women are just visitors in a male space, there to be assessed by appearance and summarily dismissed or flirted with.

Ashley Ross, TIME:

To legitimize catcalling is to give voice to those who don’t deserve it: the man who told me he wanted to perform oral sex on me, the man who said he wanted it the other way around and the man who said he could have me if he wanted me. 

The dehumanizing culture of catcalling must stop, but conservative media outlets like Fox aren’t helping. It’s up to us all to educate ourselves about the harms of harassment, so that women can truly be free in the streets of America.

"Let men be men": Fox hosts eagerly agreed with the NY Post article that claimed “catcalls are flattering.” 

A few more gems from this segment

  • "They mean it in a nice way."
  • "It’s nice to get compliments."
  • "As long as you don’t come within arms length, it’s fine."

But for many women, catcalls are humiliating and degrading. Some blame themselves, wondering what they could have done differently to prevent it. And the consequences can considerably affect a person’s social behavior and habits, as women report they avoid eye contact and walking alone in public, or change their outfits or routes to avoid harassment.”  

In reality, this is no small problem. According to Stop Street Harassment, “at least 65% of women have experienced catcalls, leers, and unwanted sexual propositions,” disproportionately affecting those with low incomes, women of color, and the LGBTQ community. And while there are federal laws protecting women from workplace harassment, street harassment is addressed on a state-by-state basis.

Let’s bring some voices of reason into this discussion:

Natalie DiBlasio, USA TODAY:

Catcalling does not mean you are beautiful, smart, strong or interesting. Catcalling means a stranger values you so little he doesn’t care if he makes you feel uncomfortable or threatened.

Margaret Eby, Brooklyn Magazine:

Catcalling is about control, not about your cute shorts. It’s an assertion that women are just visitors in a male space, there to be assessed by appearance and summarily dismissed or flirted with.

Ashley Ross, TIME:

To legitimize catcalling is to give voice to those who don’t deserve it: the man who told me he wanted to perform oral sex on me, the man who said he wanted it the other way around and the man who said he could have me if he wanted me.

The dehumanizing culture of catcalling must stop, but conservative media outlets like Fox aren’t helping. It’s up to us all to educate ourselves about the harms of harassment, so that women can truly be free in the streets of America.

321
greenthepress:

So who are the Koch Brothers anyways? 
Here are the facts: 
They have an enormous political influence: Associated Press said they are “shaping politics” this year, and three GOP candidates credited them for their success.
They are Big Oil barons, who made their fortune on oil refining and continue to get the bulk of their wealth from the fossil fuel industry.
They spend far more than any “liberal equivalents,” and they spend in line with their financial interests.
They use shady operations and "dark money" to fund their interests.
They pretend to advocate economic liberty, but they attack renewables exclusively while defending fossil fuels.
They claim to have a good environmental track record but their company is responsible for hundreds of oil spills, paid hundreds of millions in fines, and even caused deaths.
They push an extreme agenda. 
Read more Myths and Facts about the Koch Brothers
Photo from Greenpeace

greenthepress:

So who are the Koch Brothers anyways? 

Here are the facts: 

  • They have an enormous political influence: Associated Press said they are “shaping politics” this year, and three GOP candidates credited them for their success.
  • They are Big Oil barons, who made their fortune on oil refining and continue to get the bulk of their wealth from the fossil fuel industry.
  • They spend far more than any “liberal equivalents,” and they spend in line with their financial interests.
  • They use shady operations and "dark money" to fund their interests.
  • They pretend to advocate economic liberty, but they attack renewables exclusively while defending fossil fuels.
  • They claim to have a good environmental track record but their company is responsible for hundreds of oil spills, paid hundreds of millions in fines, and even caused deaths.
  • They push an extreme agenda. 

Read more Myths and Facts about the Koch Brothers

Photo from Greenpeace

Bill O’Reilly “does not believe in white privilege,” saying it’s a “big lie that is keeping some African-Americans from reaching their full potential.”
Now back to reality:
One in 3 black men can expect to go to prison at some point. 
A black college student “has the same chances of getting a job as a white high school dropout.” 
Media cover 19.5% of cases with missing African American children, while 33.2% of missing children cases involve black kids. 
At least “4 million African-Americans and Latinos experience housing discrimination each year.” 
While black Americans make up 14% of monthly drug users, “they are 37% of the people arrested for drug offenses.” 
We could go on and on and on…
Yes, this is the same multimillionaire who "exempt[ed]" himself from “that white privilege banner” because he used to “paint houses” and “cut lawns.”   Bill O’Reilly “does not believe in white privilege,” saying it’s a “big lie that is keeping some African-Americans from reaching their full potential.”
Now back to reality:
One in 3 black men can expect to go to prison at some point. 
A black college student “has the same chances of getting a job as a white high school dropout.” 
Media cover 19.5% of cases with missing African American children, while 33.2% of missing children cases involve black kids. 
At least “4 million African-Americans and Latinos experience housing discrimination each year.” 
While black Americans make up 14% of monthly drug users, “they are 37% of the people arrested for drug offenses.” 
We could go on and on and on…
Yes, this is the same multimillionaire who "exempt[ed]" himself from “that white privilege banner” because he used to “paint houses” and “cut lawns.”  

Bill O’Reilly “does not believe in white privilege,” saying it’s a “big lie that is keeping some African-Americans from reaching their full potential.”

Now back to reality:

  • One in 3 black men can expect to go to prison at some point. 
  • A black college student “has the same chances of getting a job as a white high school dropout.” 
  • Media cover 19.5% of cases with missing African American children, while 33.2% of missing children cases involve black kids. 
  • At least “4 million African-Americans and Latinos experience housing discrimination each year.” 
  • While black Americans make up 14% of monthly drug users, “they are 37% of the people arrested for drug offenses.” 
  • We could go on and on and on

Yes, this is the same multimillionaire who "exempt[ed]" himself from “that white privilege banner” because he used to “paint houses” and “cut lawns.”  

247
You see, you being ignorant of [the media response to violence in Chicago] doesn’t mean the issue itself is being ignored, in the same way that when it snows where you live doesn’t mean the world isn’t getting hotter.

John Stewart, on Fox News’ outrage that the situation in Ferguson is being overblown while “journalists are not covering” violence in Chicago.

Yes, what could explain the lack of outrage about Al Sharpton and his ilk not doing anything about black-on-black violence in Chicago?

…Because African American leaders did hold a summit about that in November. And have met at least three times in the city just in the last 13 months. Which is not to say it’s effective, but taken along with the President’s My Brother’s Keeper initiative, which attempts to address this violence, and the countless vigils and marches within these violence torn communities means they are trying actually to do something. 

You see, you being ignorant of those attempts doesn’t mean the issue itself is being ignored, in the same way that when it snows where you live doesn’t mean the world isn’t getting hotter. 

(via greenthepress)

115
You remember Jackie Robinson and Willie Mays. Weren’t they fabulous athletes — I idolized Willie Mays. And what do we have now? What do we have now? Gangsta rappers, you know, Beyoncé.
Fox spent much of its VMA coverage questioning Beyonce’s ability to promote feminism while being "extremely sexual."  
Megyn Kelly labeled Beyonce’s message and lyrics as “skanky,” while a FoxNews.com article claimed the singer “seemed to ensure her behind was the focus on each song, all the while educating young viewers about feminism.”
On The Five, Fox hosts suggested “she’s auditioning for a future husband,” and Greg Gutfeld announced that ”the greatest thing about pop culture is convincing women that acting like strippers is empowering.” 
What Fox failed to recognize is that expressing sexuality does not automatically remove a woman’s right to discuss equality. Instead, the network righteously shamed Beyonce and used her performance as basis to attack feminism as a whole. In reality, such policing of women’s sexuality has harmed progress toward equality. The very same mindset has been used to dismiss women’s need to access contraception, and blame rape survivors for their own assaults. 
If anyone is going to be shamed, it should be Fox and its irresponsible coverage of women’s issues.  Fox spent much of its VMA coverage questioning Beyonce’s ability to promote feminism while being "extremely sexual."  
Megyn Kelly labeled Beyonce’s message and lyrics as “skanky,” while a FoxNews.com article claimed the singer “seemed to ensure her behind was the focus on each song, all the while educating young viewers about feminism.”
On The Five, Fox hosts suggested “she’s auditioning for a future husband,” and Greg Gutfeld announced that ”the greatest thing about pop culture is convincing women that acting like strippers is empowering.” 
What Fox failed to recognize is that expressing sexuality does not automatically remove a woman’s right to discuss equality. Instead, the network righteously shamed Beyonce and used her performance as basis to attack feminism as a whole. In reality, such policing of women’s sexuality has harmed progress toward equality. The very same mindset has been used to dismiss women’s need to access contraception, and blame rape survivors for their own assaults. 
If anyone is going to be shamed, it should be Fox and its irresponsible coverage of women’s issues.  Fox spent much of its VMA coverage questioning Beyonce’s ability to promote feminism while being "extremely sexual."  
Megyn Kelly labeled Beyonce’s message and lyrics as “skanky,” while a FoxNews.com article claimed the singer “seemed to ensure her behind was the focus on each song, all the while educating young viewers about feminism.”
On The Five, Fox hosts suggested “she’s auditioning for a future husband,” and Greg Gutfeld announced that ”the greatest thing about pop culture is convincing women that acting like strippers is empowering.” 
What Fox failed to recognize is that expressing sexuality does not automatically remove a woman’s right to discuss equality. Instead, the network righteously shamed Beyonce and used her performance as basis to attack feminism as a whole. In reality, such policing of women’s sexuality has harmed progress toward equality. The very same mindset has been used to dismiss women’s need to access contraception, and blame rape survivors for their own assaults. 
If anyone is going to be shamed, it should be Fox and its irresponsible coverage of women’s issues. 

Fox spent much of its VMA coverage questioning Beyonce’s ability to promote feminism while being "extremely sexual."  

Megyn Kelly labeled Beyonce’s message and lyrics as “skanky,” while a FoxNews.com article claimed the singer “seemed to ensure her behind was the focus on each song, all the while educating young viewers about feminism.”

On The Five, Fox hosts suggested “she’s auditioning for a future husband,” and Greg Gutfeld announced that ”the greatest thing about pop culture is convincing women that acting like strippers is empowering.” 

What Fox failed to recognize is that expressing sexuality does not automatically remove a woman’s right to discuss equality. Instead, the network righteously shamed Beyonce and used her performance as basis to attack feminism as a whole. In reality, such policing of women’s sexuality has harmed progress toward equality. The very same mindset has been used to dismiss women’s need to access contraception, and blame rape survivors for their own assaults. 

If anyone is going to be shamed, it should be Fox and its irresponsible coverage of women’s issues. 

33
States should not take Ohio’s lead on freezing renewable energy standards - The Boston Globe
776
Disgusting: Now NRA News is praising the white vigilante patrols that shot black New Orleans flood victims following Hurricane Katrina. 


What really happened:

Facing an influx of refugees, the residents of Algiers Point could have pulled together food, water and medical supplies for the flood victims. Instead, a group of white residents, convinced that crime would arrive with the human exodus, sought to seal off the area, blocking the roads in and out of the neighborhood by dragging lumber and downed trees into the streets. They stockpiled handguns, assault rifles, shotguns and at least one Uzi and began patrolling the streets in pickup trucks and SUVs. The newly formed militia, a loose band of about fifteen to thirty residents, most of them men, all of them white, was looking for thieves, outlaws or, as one member put it, anyone who simply “didn’t belong.”

According to The Nation, during this time ”at least eleven people were shot. In each case the targets were African-American men, while the shooters, it appears, were all white.”
Donnell Herrington was one of these victims:

It was September 1, 2005, some three days after Hurricane Katrina crashed into New Orleans, and somebody had just blasted Herrington, who is African-American, with a shotgun. “I just hit the ground. I didn’t even know what happened,” recalls Herrington, a burly 32-year-old with a soft drawl … Herrington says he hadn’t even seen the men or their weapons before the shooting began. As Alexander and Collins fled, Herrington ran in the opposite direction, his hand pressed to the bleeding wound on his throat. Behind him, he says, the gunmen yelled, “Get him! Get that nigger!”
The attack occurred in Algiers Point. The Point, as locals call it, is a neighborhood within a neighborhood, a small cluster of ornate, immaculately maintained 150-year-old houses within the larger Algiers district. A nationally recognized historic area, Algiers Point is largely white, while the rest of Algiers is predominantly black. It’s a “white enclave” whose residents have “a kind of siege mentality,” says Tulane University historian Lance Hill, noting that some white New Orleanians “think of themselves as an oppressed minority.” 
Disgusting: Now NRA News is praising the white vigilante patrols that shot black New Orleans flood victims following Hurricane Katrina. 


What really happened:

Facing an influx of refugees, the residents of Algiers Point could have pulled together food, water and medical supplies for the flood victims. Instead, a group of white residents, convinced that crime would arrive with the human exodus, sought to seal off the area, blocking the roads in and out of the neighborhood by dragging lumber and downed trees into the streets. They stockpiled handguns, assault rifles, shotguns and at least one Uzi and began patrolling the streets in pickup trucks and SUVs. The newly formed militia, a loose band of about fifteen to thirty residents, most of them men, all of them white, was looking for thieves, outlaws or, as one member put it, anyone who simply “didn’t belong.”

According to The Nation, during this time ”at least eleven people were shot. In each case the targets were African-American men, while the shooters, it appears, were all white.”
Donnell Herrington was one of these victims:

It was September 1, 2005, some three days after Hurricane Katrina crashed into New Orleans, and somebody had just blasted Herrington, who is African-American, with a shotgun. “I just hit the ground. I didn’t even know what happened,” recalls Herrington, a burly 32-year-old with a soft drawl … Herrington says he hadn’t even seen the men or their weapons before the shooting began. As Alexander and Collins fled, Herrington ran in the opposite direction, his hand pressed to the bleeding wound on his throat. Behind him, he says, the gunmen yelled, “Get him! Get that nigger!”
The attack occurred in Algiers Point. The Point, as locals call it, is a neighborhood within a neighborhood, a small cluster of ornate, immaculately maintained 150-year-old houses within the larger Algiers district. A nationally recognized historic area, Algiers Point is largely white, while the rest of Algiers is predominantly black. It’s a “white enclave” whose residents have “a kind of siege mentality,” says Tulane University historian Lance Hill, noting that some white New Orleanians “think of themselves as an oppressed minority.” 

Disgusting: Now NRA News is praising the white vigilante patrols that shot black New Orleans flood victims following Hurricane Katrina. 

What really happened:

Facing an influx of refugees, the residents of Algiers Point could have pulled together food, water and medical supplies for the flood victims. Instead, a group of white residents, convinced that crime would arrive with the human exodus, sought to seal off the area, blocking the roads in and out of the neighborhood by dragging lumber and downed trees into the streets. They stockpiled handguns, assault rifles, shotguns and at least one Uzi and began patrolling the streets in pickup trucks and SUVs. The newly formed militia, a loose band of about fifteen to thirty residents, most of them men, all of them white, was looking for thieves, outlaws or, as one member put it, anyone who simply “didn’t belong.”

According to The Nation, during this time ”at least eleven people were shot. In each case the targets were African-American men, while the shooters, it appears, were all white.”

Donnell Herrington was one of these victims:

It was September 1, 2005, some three days after Hurricane Katrina crashed into New Orleans, and somebody had just blasted Herrington, who is African-American, with a shotgun. “I just hit the ground. I didn’t even know what happened,” recalls Herrington, a burly 32-year-old with a soft drawl … Herrington says he hadn’t even seen the men or their weapons before the shooting began. As Alexander and Collins fled, Herrington ran in the opposite direction, his hand pressed to the bleeding wound on his throat. Behind him, he says, the gunmen yelled, “Get him! Get that nigger!”

The attack occurred in Algiers Point. The Point, as locals call it, is a neighborhood within a neighborhood, a small cluster of ornate, immaculately maintained 150-year-old houses within the larger Algiers district. A nationally recognized historic area, Algiers Point is largely white, while the rest of Algiers is predominantly black. It’s a “white enclave” whose residents have “a kind of siege mentality,” says Tulane University historian Lance Hill, noting that some white New Orleanians “think of themselves as an oppressed minority.”